CDS Announces Undergraduate Summer School Classes

undergrad

The Center for Documentary Studies is sponsoring four summer school classes for Duke University undergraduates, see below, in addition to a number of other summer courses cross-listed with Documentary Studies (DOCST). (The classes are also open to high school students and visiting undergrads.)

Click here for more information on how to register. Scroll down for instructor bios.

TERM 1 (May 13–June 25)

DOCST 105S Documentary Experience: A Video Approach

Instructor: Gary Hawkins
MTuTh 2–4:05 p.m. (Smith Warehouse, Bay 12, Room 228)
A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. Working closely with local groups, students will explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Each student will complete an edited video as a final project. Cross list: CULANTH 106S, AMI 331S, HISTORY 125S, POLSCI 105S, PUBPOL 170S, VMS 106S

DOCST 115S Introduction to Black-and-White Photography

Instructor: Aaron Canipe
MTuTh 2–4:05 p.m. (CDS, Bridges 201)
Foundation class in photography utilizing black-and-white film and a wet darkroom. Students shoot, process, and print individual work throughout the semester. Emphasis on continual visual exploration of meaning and metaphor in the form of regular assignments, slide lectures of important historic and contemporary photographic work, and critiques of each other’s work. No textbooks are required, though students will need to budget a comparable amount for supplies and equipment. Cross list: ARTSVIS 115S/VMS 115S


TERM 2 (June 29–August 9) 

DOCST 115S Introduction to Black-and-White Photography
Instructor: Jon-Sesrie Goff
MTuTh 2–4:05 p.m. (CDS, Bridges 201)
Foundation class in photography utilizing black-and-white film and a wet darkroom. Students shoot, process, and print individual work throughout the semester. Emphasis on continual visual exploration of meaning and metaphor in the form of regular assignments, slide lectures of important historic and contemporary photographic work, and critiques of each other’s work. No textbooks are required, though students will need to budget a comparable amount for supplies and equipment. Cross list: ARTSVIS 115S/VMS 115S

DOCST 224S: Literacy Through Photography
Instructor: Katie Hyde
MTuWThF 2–4:05 p.m. (Perkins LINK 070, Seminar 4)
Explores the Literacy Through Photography arts education methodology, which encourages children to explore their world as they photograph scenes from their own lives, using their images as catalysts for verbal and written expression. Students train in LTP’s methodology, including discussing LTP projects from around the world and engaging in LTP internships with Durham Public Schools. Encourages participants to see through the eyes of others—to understand LTP writings and photographs as expressions of young people’s culture and time. Class meetings involve lectures and presentations, class discussions, as well as hands-on activities with classmates and collaborating youth. Includes a service-learning component involving work in the community. Consent of instructor required. Cross list: EDUC 244S, VMS 207S

Gary Hawkins is a filmmaker and longtime film instructor at the Center for Documentary Studies. Previously, he was a member of the directing faculty at the North Carolina School of the Arts, in the School of Filmmaking, from 1991 until 1999. Hawkins has written and directed six films, including award-winning films in his acclaimed series about working-class Southern authors, the Emmy-winning Rough South of Harry Crews and The Rough South of Larry Brown, which was picked by The Oxford American as one of Thirteen Essential Southern Documentaries. Hawkins wrote the screenplay for last year’s Joe, adapted from the book by Larry Brown; the film was directed by David Gordon Green and starred Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan.

Jon-Sesrie Goff is an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts student at Duke University (’16). His work explores identity through the image of the community. Jon has over a decade of production experience, working on a range of projects across genre including the recently released documentaries Evolution of a Criminal (winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the 2014 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival) and Out In the Night. Prior to returning to school, he spent two years teaching film production as an adjunct professor at Villanova University and West Chester University of Pennsylvania.

Aaron Canipe earned a BFA in photography in 2012 from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. While in D.C, he worked as a photographer and contemporary collection archivist at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Canipe also cofounded the publishing and design imprint Empty Stretch, which focuses on curating books, zines, and exhibitions highlighting up-and-coming artists and photographers. Canipe’s own work has been published in the Washington Post, the Oxford American, and many independent print and web outlets and widely exhibited throughout the Southeast. While at Duke, Canipe has worked to process and digitize works from the William Gedney Collection. In 2015, as a part of his MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts thesis project, he self-published a book of photographs called Plateau.

Katie Hyde is the director of Literacy Through Photography (LTP), a program based at the Center for Documentary Studies. In this capacity, she works closely with undergraduate students, community volunteers, and teachers and students in the Durham Public Schools. Hyde is also one of the leaders of LTP Arusha, a DukeEngage initiative that is part of an effort to work with teachers in Arusha, Tanzania, to build an LTP program. She teaches an LTP course that deals with children’s self-expression and with race and gender issues within education, as well as Sociology Through Photography, which uses documentary photography as a tool to see the world through a sociological lens. Hyde earned her doctorate in sociology at North Carolina State University. She has explored how social inequalities are constructed, perpetuated, and resisted through fieldwork and other research on recent Latino/a immigration in North Carolina, women’s activism in Russia, and girls’ education in rural Nepal.

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