CDS Announces 2016 Undergraduate Summer School Classes

undergrad

The Center for Documentary Studies is sponsoring four summer school classes for Duke University undergraduates, see below, in addition to a number of other summer courses cross-listed with Documentary Studies (DOCST). (The classes are also open to high school students and visiting undergrads.)

Click here for more information on how to register. Scroll down for instructor bios.

Summer I 2016 (May 18 – June 30)

DOCST 105S Documentary Experience: A Video Approach
Instructor: Gary Hawkins
MTuTh 02:00 PM-04:05 PM (Smith Warehouse, Bay 12, Room 228)
A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. Working closely with local groups, students explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Students complete an edited video as their final project. Not open to students who have taken this course as Film/Video/Digital 105S. Cross list: CULANTH 106S, AMI 331S, HISTORY 125S, POLSCI 105S, PUBPOL 170S, VMS 106S

DOCST 115S Introduction to Black & White Photography
Instructor: Alex Cunningham
MTuTh 02:00 PM-04:05 PM (CDS, Bridges 201)
Foundation class in photography utilizing black-and-white film and a wet darkroom. Shoot, process, and print individual work throughout the semester. Emphasis on continual visual exploration of meaning and metaphor in the form of regular assignments, slide lectures of important historic and contemporary photographic work, and critiques of each other’s work. No textbooks are required, though students will need to budget a comparable amount for supplies and equipment. Cross list: ARTSVIS 115S, VMS 115S

DOCST 171SA Capturing the City: Documentary Photography in Berlin
Instructor: Christopher Sims
MW 01:00 PM-04:00 PM (STUDY AWAY, Berlin)
Through excursions to museums, art galleries, and studio visits with photographers and documentarians in Berlin, students will learn and practice the analysis and interpretation of still photography. Students will conduct documentary photography fieldwork projects focused on interpreting cultural life, public spaces, landscapes, and people in Berlin, and will mount an exhibition of their work. Students will learn the techniques and practice of color photography—composition, lighting, color correction, editing, and sequencing—alongside studying the history and development of documentary photography in Germany. Project fieldwork sites may include Tempelhof airfield (a Nazi-era airport made famous during the 1948–1949 Berlin Airlift and now used as a public park as well as reception center for refugees), flea markets, and the Berlin U-Bahn. Cross list: DOCST 171SA, ARTVIS 17SA, VMS 171SA

Summer II 2016 (July 5 – August 14)

DOCST 115S Introduction to Black & White Photography
Instructor: Tamika Galanis
MTuTh 02:00 PM-04:05 PM (CDS, Bridges 201)
Foundation class in photography utilizing black-and-white film and a wet darkroom. Shoot, process, and print individual work throughout the semester. Emphasis on continual visual exploration of meaning and metaphor in the form of regular assignments, slide lectures of important historic and contemporary photographic work, and critiques of each other’s work. No textbooks are required, though students will need to budget a comparable amount for supplies and equipment. Cross list: ARTSVIS 115S, VMS 115S

 

Alex Cunningham earned his BFA in film, photography, and visual arts in 2012 from Ithaca College. He worked at Cornell University photographing, digitizing, processing, and archiving university collections. He has shown films at film festivals all over the world and exhibited photographic and installation work in Ithaca, Brooklyn, and Durham, North Carolina. Alex has made photographic books of his own work and of work by others under the self-publishing title UNSUBbooks, and his photobook moonsoot, containing abstract 35mm photographs from India, is in the Indie Photobook Library. He is a student in Duke’s MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (’16) and is this year’s Kenan Graduate Arts Fellow at Duke’s Kenan Institute for Ethics. He is currently finishing up his thesis project, a documentary about the instability and variability of the Indian monsoon, as well as several short films shot and edited on 16mm film.

Tamika Galanis
is a visual artist and native of Nassau, Bahamas, whose work addresses diasporic-disconnect by examining issues of home, culture, identity, and performance. Emphasizing the importance of Afro-Bahamian cultural identity for cultural preservation, she documents the aspects of Bahamian life that are not curated for tourist consumption. Primarily a photographer, Galanis also creates multimedia art works through the use of video and 3D installation. These art works counter the widely held paradisiacal view of the Caribbean, the origins of which arose post-emancipation through a controlled, systematic visual framing and commodification of the tropics. Galanis
 is a student in Duke’s MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (’16).

Gary Hawkins is a filmmaker and longtime film instructor at the Center for Documentary Studies. Previously, he was a member of the directing faculty at the North Carolina School of the Arts, in the School of Filmmaking, from 1991 until 1999. Hawkins has written and directed six films, including award-winning films in his acclaimed series about working-class Southern authors, the Emmy-winning Rough South of Harry Crews and The Rough South of Larry Brown, which was picked by The Oxford American as one of Thirteen Essential Southern Documentaries. Hawkins wrote the screenplay for last year’s Joe, adapted from the book by Larry Brown; the film was directed by David Gordon Green and starred Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan.

Christopher Sims is the Undergraduate Educator Director at the Center for Documentary Studies and a Lecturing Fellow in Documentary Arts. He has an undergraduate degree in history from Duke University, a master’s degree in visual communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a M.F.A. in studio art from the Maryland Institute College of Art. He has worked as a photo archivist at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. and, at CDS, has coordinated the exhibition, awards, and web programs. His most recent exhibitions include shows at SF Camerawork, the Griffin Museum of Photography, the Houston Center for Photography, the Light Factory, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. His project about Guantanamo Bay was featured in The Washington Post, the BBC World Service, Roll Call, and Flavorwire. He is represented by Ann Stewart Fine Art in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Civilian Art Projects in Washington, D.C., and Clark Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts. He was selected as the recipient of the Baum Award for Emerging American Photographers in 2010 and named one of the “new Superstars of Southern Art” by the Oxford American magazine in 2012.

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