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    September 9: Free Screening of “Rosenwald” In Hillsborough, NC

    August 31st, 2016
    Detail from the "Rosenwald" film poster

    Detail from the “Rosenwald” film poster

    Aviva Kempner’s Rosenwald: The Remarkable Story of a Jewish Partnership with African American Communitiewill screen in Hillsborough, North Carolina. Kempner’s documentary explores a little-known initiative that resulted in the creation of thousands of schools for poor, rural African-American children in southern states at a time when few received any public education. The screening is free and open to the public; a Q&A with Kempner will follow. View the film trailer here

    Rosenwald Screening and Q&A with Aviva Kempner
    Friday, September 9, 6:45 p.m.
    Russell Rosenwald School Lawn
    2001 Saint Marys Road, Hillsborough, North Carolina

    Julius Rosenwald never finished high school but rose to become the president and later chairman of the venerable Sears, Roebuck, and Co. Influenced by the writings of the educator Booker T. Washington, this Jewish philanthropist joined forces with African American communities during the early twentieth century to build over 5,300 schools that, between 1915. Inspired by the Jewish ideals of tzedakah (charity) and tikkun olam (repairing the world), and a deep concern over racial inequality in America, Julius Rosenwald used his wealth to become one of America’s most effective philanthropists. Because of his modesty, Rosenwald’s philanthropy and social activism are not well known today. He gave away $62 million in his lifetime.

    Aviva Kempner has a mission in life: Her films investigate non-stereotypical images of Jews in history and celebrate the untold stories of Jewish heroes.  In addition to Rosenwald: The Remarkable Story of a Jewish Partnership with African American Communities, she conceived of and produced Partisans of Vilna, a documentary on Jewish resistance against the Nazis, produced and directed Peabody-winning and Emmy-nominated The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg, about the Jewish slugger who fought anti-Semitism in the 1930’s and 40’s, and produced and directed Yoo-Hoo, Mrs. Goldberg, a humorous and eye-opening story of television pioneer Gertrude Berg. 

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      September 6: CDS Continuing Education Information Session

      August 29th, 2016
      The Center for Documentary Studies. Photograph by Hannah Colton.

      The Center for Documentary Studies. Photograph by Hannah Colton.

      The Center for Documentary Studies offers Continuing Education classes year-round—in photography, video, audio, narrative writing, and other creative media. An open information session about CDS Continuing Education courses will be held on Tuesday, September 6, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Come and ask questions about courses at CDS, meet instructors and Continuing Ed director April Walton, and learn about the Certificate in Documentary Arts; prospective and current students welcome. The information session is free and open to the public, but please register to help us gauge attendance.

      Registration is now open for Fall 2016 classes and workshops with a host of established, new, and online classes on offer. A complete listing of all Fall 2016 courses as well as registration information can be found here.

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        “Southern Accent” Opens September 1 at Duke’s Nasher Museum of Art

        August 26th, 2016
        "Tabaco (Tobacco)" by Diego Camposeco, a 2014 John Hope Franklin Awardwinner.

        “Tabaco (Tobacco)” by Diego Camposeco, a CDS John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Award winner.

        The Nasher Museum of Art’s upcoming exhibition, Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art, “reflects upon and pulls apart the dynamic nature of the South’s social, political, and cultural landscape” through the work of sixty artists. The timing of Southern Accent,” says the Nasher’s Trevor Schoonmaker, Chief Curator and Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher Curator of Contemporary Art, is especially meaningful now—in the wake of Charleston, Orlando, Baton Rouge, and countless other tragedies, and given the tense social and racial climate during this presidential election year. . . . I hope Southern Accent can create a space to reimagine the South in new ways and reframe the way we think about the South in contemporary art.

        Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art
        September 1, 2016–January 8, 2017
        Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University
        2001 Campus Dr., Durham, North Carolina 27705

        Click here for information about the Opening Party on August 31, a conversation and book signing with writer Bill Ferris and Tom Rankin (Southern Accent artist, director of Duke’s MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA|EDA) and former director of  the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS)) on September 1, and other exhibition-related events.

        In addition to Rankin, CDS has ties to a number of the artists featured in the show, including one of the youngest artists, Diego Camposeco, a recent UNC–Chapel Hill graduate whose work in Southern Accent was directly supported by a CDS John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Award in 2014; Rachel Boillot (MFA|EDA graduate, ’14): Jessica Ingram (in the CDS exhibition Road Through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial and the CDS book 25 Under 25: Up and Coming American Photographers, Vol. 1); Deborah Luster (Lange-Taylor Prize winner with C.D. Wright for One Big Self: Prisoners of Louisiana, 2000); Mark Steinmetz (published in DoubleTake magazine); Hank Willis Thomas (published in the CDS book 25 Under 25: Up and Coming American Photographers, Vol. 1); and Jeff Whetstone (published in DoubleTake magazine and a CDS alum).

        Southern Accent is co-organized by Trevor Schoonmaker and Miranda Lash, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky. The exhibition will travel to the Speed Art Museum, where it will be on view April 29–August 20, 2017.

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          September 16: Full Frame Screens “The House on Coco Road”

          August 26th, 2016
          A film still from "The House on Coco Road"

          A film still from “The House on Coco Road”

          The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival will host free film screenings around the Triangle this summer and fall. Third Friday screenings will take place at the Full Frame Theater in Durham, with additional screenings in Cary, Raleigh, and Chapel Hill as part of the Full Frame Road Show presented by PNC. Full Frame is a program of the Center for Documentary Studies.

          *Note that while screenings are free, all attendees must reserve a ticket via Eventbrite for each screening. Tickets are available for Third Friday screenings starting at 9 a.m. on the day of the event, and for Full Frame Road Show screenings at 9 a.m. on the Monday prior to the screening; for Road Show screenings at the Cary Theater and North Carolina Museum of Art, members will be able to reserve tickets the Sunday prior.

          For more information on the screenings and the films, go to Full Frame’s website.

          In Pursuit of Silence (Third Friday)
          Friday, July 15, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
          Full Frame TheaterAmerican Tobacco Campus
          320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina
          Directions | Tickets*
                 

          In Pursuit of Silence (Full Frame Road Show)
          Thursday, July 28, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)

          The Cary Theater
          122 E. Chatham St., Cary, North Carolina

          Directions | Tickets*

          Contemporary Color (Third Friday)
          Friday, August 19, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
          Full Frame TheaterAmerican Tobacco Campus
          320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina
          Directions | Tickets*
             

          Contemporary Color (Full Frame Road Show)
          Wednesday, August 24, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
          Silverspot Cinema
          201 S. Estes Dr. #100, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
          Directions | Tickets*
             

          The House on Coco Road (Third Friday)
          Friday, September 16, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
          Full Frame TheaterAmerican Tobacco Campus
          320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina
          Directions | Tickets*
             

          Burden (Full Frame Road Show)
          Saturday, October 8, 2 p.m. (doors at 1:30 p.m.)
          North Carolina Museum of Art, SECU Auditorium
          2110 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh, North Carolina
          Directions | Tickets*
             

          Burden (Third Friday)
          Friday, October 21, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
          Full Frame TheaterAmerican Tobacco Campus
          320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina
          Directions | Tickets*
             

          The Ballad of Fred Hersch (Full Frame Road Show)
          Thursday, November 3, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
          The Cary Theater
          122 E. Chatham St., Cary, North Carolina

          Directions | Tickets*

          The Ballad of Fred Hersch (Third Friday)
          Friday, November 18, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
          Full Frame TheaterAmerican Tobacco Campus
          320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina
          Directions | Tickets*
             

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            August 26: Final Installment of “Audio Under The Stars”

            August 25th, 2016

            AUTS_AugustCropped

            Audio Under the Stars—a series of summer-long outdoor listening parties hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies and created by two graduates of our Certificate in Documentary Arts program—debuted in 2014 to widespread delight, with curated playlists of compelling audio pieces. This month’s show is “Work It: Stories of Labor and Leisure,” featuring stories about any kind of work and play. Bring a blanket, bring a picnic, bring a friend or three, then lie back under the stars and listen (This is an outdoor event; rain date Friday, September 2). RSVP for “Work It” on the series’ Facebook page, and scroll down for the full Audio Under the Stars schedule. 

            Note: Shows are from 8–10 p.m. at the Center for Documentary Studies, in Durham, North Carolina. Free parking. Directions.

            Audio Under The Stars, Season 3

            Bad Advice & Second Chances
            Show: May 27 (rain date June 3)
            Some of us have actually paid cash money for a 1974 Dodge Dart. Tell us your stories about when you listened to your Uncle Leo rather than your common sense and a Consumer Reports review, or any other time you told that small voice in your head to shut up and sit down, and how you’ve lived to tell the tale.

            Destination Unknown: Trips, Travels, and Unexpected Journeys
            Show: June 17 (rain date June 25)
            Tell us about a time when you went in search of something: a new place, a lost love, a chance at following a dream. Or when you set out just for fun—where did the wanderlust take you and who did you meet along the way? We want stories of those eager for change and those longing for what’s left behind.

            Danger: Tales of Mischief and Misfortune
            Show: July 22 (rain date July 29)
            We’re looking for stories with an element of danger, either real or imagined. A lurking threat, a prank gone wrong, bullets dodged or imminent disaster. These could be humorous or serious; ideally, stories will have a bit of each.

            Work It: Stories of Labor and Leisure
            Show: August 26 (rain date September 2)
            Drudgery or dream job—how do you make your money? What’s the oddest job you’ve ever taken? What would push you to walk away? At the end of the day, how do you put the world of work behind you? We’re looking for stories about any kind of work and play.

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              2016 First Book Prize in Photography Countdown Highlights Past Winners: From 2010, Benjamin Lowy’s “Iraq | Perspectives”

              August 25th, 2016
              From “Iraq | Perspectives” by Benjamin Lowy

              From “Iraq | Perspectives” by Benjamin Lowy

              The CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography is a biennial prize that offers publication of a book of photography, a $3,000 award, and inclusion in a website devoted to presenting the work of winners of the prize. Each year a significant and innovative artist, curator, or writer in photography is chosen to judge the prize and write an introduction to the winning book.

              In the months preceding the 2016 prize’s submission deadline, we’re taking a look back at previous winners. Benjamin Lowy was selected as the 2010 prizewinner by iconic photographer William Eggleston. Lowy shot the arresting color photographs in Iraq | Perspectives over a six-year period through Humvee windows and military-issue night vision goggles. “Iraq was a land of blast walls and barbed wire fences,” he writes. “These pictures show a fragment of Iraqi daily life taken by a transient passenger in a Humvee; yet they are a window to a world where work, play, tension, grief, survival, and everything in between is as familiar as the events of our own lives.” The acclaimed book was widely reviewed and was chosen as a top photo book of 2011 by Time Magazine and the British Journal of PhotographyScroll down to watch a video and interview with Benjamin Lowy about his prizewinning project, and go to firstbookprizephoto.com/photogalleries to view work by all past winners.

              Benjamin Lowy

              Benjamin Lowy

              “I was covering Iraq for years, 2003, 2004, 2005—I missed 2006—2007, 2008,” said Lowy. “At some point I realized all these pictures I’m making, they’re digital, appear mostly on the Internet for an hour before they’re refreshed with something new. . . . If you look at photojournalism in the last ten years, a lot of people have been pushing the envelope to create a new way of seeing because we’re so inundated with images day in and day out. It’s not like how it used to be, where a very few people had cameras. Now everyone has one, and you have to find a unique way of photographing something that’s different than what other people see, and expect to see. . . . A book lasts. It becomes something more. . . . A book, for photographers, is the ultimate legacy.”

              Submissions for the eighth CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography are now being accepted through September 15, 2016. Peter Barberie, the Brodsky Curator of Photographs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will be this year’s prize judge. Melissa Harris, editor-in-chief of the Aperture Foundation, will chair the selection committee that chooses the finalists.

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                Listen: Short Audio Docs from the 2016 Hearing Is Believing Audio Institute

                August 18th, 2016
                2015 Hearing Is Believing

                Students and faculty from the summer 2016 CDS introductory audio institute, Hearing Is Believing.

                In July 2016, CDS Continuing Education held the thirteenth annual Hearing Is Believing audio institute, a weeklong, immersive audio boot camp. 25 students from around the country were guided by CDS audio program director John Biewen and visiting instructor Shea Shackelford, with presentations by guest speakers Tina Antolini, creator of the Southern Foodways Alliance’s Gravy podcast, and John Barth of PRX. Students chose from a list of music- or audio-related topics; gathered interview and ambient sounds; and learned audio editing techniques to assemble short documentaries. The results are below.

                Couldn’t Hear Nobody Pray | Lesley Hoyt-Croft and Nicki Stein
                Throughout the summer of 2016, this country has been reeling in the wake of social injustice. As racial tensions swell, is it possible that something as simple as a song could help bring Americans together? Gospel singer Mary D. Williams thinks so.

                Derrick Ivey | Emily Alexander and Sally Hicks
                When actor Derrick Ivey portrayed a Durham leader of the Ku Klux Klan, he had to figure out how to go to an angry and uncomfortable place. Here he talks about the personal impact of spewing hatred onstage night after night.

                Girls Rock NC | Hillary Rea and Kathryn Wall
                Girls Rock NC is a summer music camp that doesn’t hide being a feminist organization that embraces all gender identities. Ninety-five teens and tweens pick up drumsticks and guitars to learn chords and write songs, but they also participate in workshops on self-defense, body confidence, and zine-making. Adult volunteers kick off a loud and noisy week with the hope that their infectious passion for Girls Rock will go viral.

                Hayti Sings the Blues | Paul Bieber and Jim Millay
                It took ninety-five years to build a vibrant, self-sustaining community centered on church, music, and financial independence—a city within a city. It took a freeway project to destroy it.

                Lorna’s Spiritual Journey | Keith Lawrence and Jonathan Stansell
                It would have been easy for Lorna Collingridge to give up on the church, a place of both refuge and anguish. But doing so would have robbed her of the joy of its rituals and history. Besides, she felt she could change what troubled her about the church—if only a little bit—through her presence and her music.

                Lorna composed all the music in this piece.

                Oasis with a Train | Graham Prichard and Nikolas Silva
                One evening a month during the summer, hundreds of people gather outdoors in Durham to listen to audio documentary pieces under the stars. Guided by a simple wish—to share good radio with friends—Jenny March and Elizabeth Friend have created a surprisingly popular series of summer happenings.

                The People’s Orchestra | Carolyn Davenport and Zoe Grueskin
                When Maya Jackson was a student at Durham’s Hillside High School in the 90s, the arts opened the door to the world beyond North Carolina. Today, she’s hoping music can open doors in her hometown and bring people together in a time of change.

                Saints and Sinners | Robin Miniter and Ebonie Thomas
                Saturday night sinners become Sunday morning saints each weekend in the South. In Durham, we hear from Marc Lee, radio host at the Juke Joint, and Reverend Larry Thomas at Union Baptist Church, about the tension that resides between bars and the blues, and gospel and grace.

                Sharing the Stage | Nicolas Eilbaum and Nathan Ratner
                For nearly twenty years, Brett Chambers’ open mic night has provided a place for musicians, poets, and other performers to share their talent with supportive and enthusiastic audiences. What has made this weekly Durham gathering a home to so many?

                Show Up and Sing | Katie Brown and Nora Ritchie
                Once a month, in a bar in Durham, Amelia Shull raises her conductor wand and 200 untrained voices respond in song. This PopUp Chorus performs hits that range from David Bowie to Michael Jackson—hits that just a few hours earlier the choristers may only have ever sung in the shower.

                Whoopin’ It Up! | Christy Baugh and Marie Bongiovanni
                Linda Cooper is a contra dance caller in the Triangle area of North Carolina. She’s passionate about the power of traditional dancing. And for thirty years she’s been bringing dancers and musicians together to “whoop it up!”

                You Can’t Google a Guitar | Conrad Fulkerson and Ben LoCascio
                For musicians, instruments often become extensions of themselves. This connection deepens when the instrument has been crafted, piece by piece, by their own hands. Luthier Ken Mitchell and his student, Knox Engler, recount their journey together to create a guitar.

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                  September 7: CDS Hosts Launch Event for Writer Belle Boggs and “The Art of Waiting”

                  August 16th, 2016
                  Belle Boggs and cover detail from "The Art of Waiting"

                  Belle Boggs and cover detail from “The Art of Waiting”

                  Boggs sensitively and creatively explores infertility, the struggle to get pregnant, and the entire concept of ‘waiting,’ which leads her to literature and pop culture. . . . Deeply thoughtful, beautiful, and illuminating.—Booklist

                  On September 7, the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) will host a book launch event for writer Belle Boggs and The Art of Waiting: On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood  (Graywolf Press). Boggs’ first nonfiction book grew out of her 2012 essay for Orion, a deeply personal story that went viral and led to republication in Harper’s and a nationally broadcast interview on NPR’s The Diane Rehm Show.

                  A reception at 6 p.m. on the CDS porch will be followed by a reading at 7 p.m. and then a conversation/Q&A led by writer Jill McCorkle. The Regulator Bookshop will have copies of the book for sale, and Boggs will be available for signing.

                  Book Launch Event with Belle Boggs
                  Wednesday, September 7, 6–8 p.m.

                  Center for Documentary Studies
                  1317 W. Pettigrew St., Durham, North Carolina
                  Directions

                  Belle Boggs is the author of the prizewinning short-story collection Mattaponi Queen, The Art of Waiting, and the forthcoming novel The Ugly Bear List, all from Graywolf Press. Her stories and essays have appeared in Orion, Harper’s, the Paris Review, Ecotone, Slate, and many other publications. She teaches in the MFA program at North Carolina State University and has been a writing instructor for CDS’s Continuing Education program.

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                    Register Now: New Fall 2016 Continuing Education Courses, Both Onsite and Online

                    August 15th, 2016
                    Photograph by Barbara Tyroler, instructor of "From Concept to Gallery"

                    Photograph by Barbara Tyroler, instructor of “From Concept to Gallery”

                    The Center for Documentary Studies offers Continuing Education classes year-round—in photography, video, audio, narrative writing, and other creative media. Registration is now open for Fall 2016 classes and workshops with a host of established, new, and online classes on offer; see our twelve new courses below.

                    Additionally, an open information session about CDS Continuing Education courses will be held on September 6 at 6 p.m. Come and ask questions about courses at CDS, meet instructors, and learn about the Certificate in Documentary Arts; prospective and current students welcome. The information session is free and open to the public, but please register to help us gauge attendance.

                    A complete listing of all Fall 2016 courses as well as registration information can be found here.

                    New Continuing Education Courses for Fall 2016 Semester:

                    Onsite and Online:
                    Making the Marketing Documentary | Joshua Dasal | Offered Onsite and Online Simultaneously
                    Shooting Video with Your iPhone | Simone Keith and Durward Rogers | Onsite and Online

                    Online Only:
                    Let’s Work the Small Stuff | David Schulman
                    The Non-Narrated Radio Voice | Sarah Reynolds
                    Visual Storytelling on Instagram | Sarah Stacke
                    Serving Lemonade | Michelle Lanier
                    Documenting Stories of Trauma | Sharon Raynor

                    Onsite Only:

                    Interactive Documentary | Lana Garland
                    From Concept to Gallery
                    Barbara Tyroler, George Entenman, and Durward Rogers
                    Photography as a Second Language | Bryce Lankard
                    Promos, Trailers, and Work Samples | Lana Garland
                    Sound for Video: From Location to Post-Production
                    Sonja Bertucci

                    *Course description link to come.

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                      2016 First Book Prize in Photography Countdown Highlights Past Winners: From 2006, Danny Wilcox Frazier’s “Driftless: Photographs from Iowa”

                      August 12th, 2016
                      Sale Barn Café, Kalona, 2005. Photograph by Danny Wilcox Frazier.

                      Sale Barn Café, Kalona, 2005. Photograph by Danny Wilcox Frazier.

                      The CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography is a biennial prize that offers publication of a book of photography, a $3,000 award, and inclusion in a website devoted to presenting the work of winners of the prize. Each year a significant and innovative artist, curator, or writer in photography is chosen to judge the prize and write an introduction to the winning book.

                      In the months preceding the 2016 prize’s submission deadline, we’re taking a look back at previous winners. Danny Wilcox Frazier was selected as the 2006 prizewinner by Robert Frank, one of America’s most important and influential photographers. The native Iowan’s black-and-white photographs in Driftless: Photographs from Iowa show a changing Midwest of vanishing towns and transformed landscapes in the wake of failing rural economies and a vast exodus of people, resources, and services to the coasts and cities, taking viewers into the lives of the individuals who stayed behind and continued to live there. Poetic and dark but illuminated with flashes of insight, Frazier’s Driftless was a New York Photo Award finalist for Best Photography Book of the Year and was featured in photo-eye, Photo District News, and Lens, the New York Times photo blog. In 2010, Frazier’s film version of Driftless won a Webby Award and was nominated for an Emmy in the “New Approaches to News & Documentary Programming” category. Scroll down to watch a video and interview with Danny Wilcox Frazier about his prizewinning project, and go to firstbookprizephoto.com/photogalleries to view work by all past winners.

                      Danny Wilcox Frazier

                      Danny Wilcox Frazier

                      “I always had this desire to leave, not necessarily to know where I was going but to leave,” said Frazier. “That tension is still there, and that tension has influenced my work, is a big part of it. I hope people recognize the tension as something that a lot of people who are from rural communities, it’s not just rural Iowa, it’s rural communities around the country, what they wrestle with—the connection to community, the connection to the culture, the connection to one’s family, but at the same time the challenges that the lack of economic opportunity, or just the influence of popular culture and mass media, has on that life. . . . Still, it’s my home. It’s where I’m from. . . . Knowing that it was going to become a book, this story that I cared so much about . . . and have that recognized by someone like Robert Frank? I mean, it’s unbelievable.”

                      Submissions for the eighth CDS/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography are now being accepted through September 15, 2016. Peter Barberie, the Brodsky Curator of Photographs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will be this year’s prize judge. Melissa Harris, editor-in-chief of the Aperture Foundation, will chair the selection committee that chooses the finalists.

                      For information on how to apply, and to view galleries of past winners: firstbookprizephoto.com.

                      Danny Wilcox Frazier: “Driftless: Photographs from Iowa” from Center for Documentary Studies on Vimeo.

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