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    Full Frame Third Friday: “King Georges” Screens FREE on August 21 and 27

    July 29th, 2015
    Still from "King Georges"

    Still from “King Georges”

    Put these two dates on your calendar: the Full Frame Film Festival will host two free screenings of King Georges in the Triangle area this month. The free Third Friday screening on August 21 in Durham and the August 27 screening at the Cary Theater are both part of the Full Frame Road Show presented by PNC.

    Friday, August 21, 7:30 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.)
    Full Frame Theater, Power Plant building
    American Tobacco Campus
    320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina
    Directions
           

    Thursday, August 27, 7 p.m. (doors at 6:30 p.m.)
    The Cary Theater
    122 E. Chatham St.
    , Cary, North Carolina
    Directions

    Le Bec-Fin is closing its doors. After 33 years, the crown jewel of the Philadelphia restaurant scene, known for its stellar French cuisine, opulent style, and impeccable service, no longer seems in step with current tastes. This film follows fiery owner and head chef Georges Perrier over the last four years of life at the restaurant, granting us ample access inside the belly of the beast. In stark contrast to the orchestrated perfection of its dining room, Le Bec-Fin’s kitchen is a constant circus of sweaty chaos and emotions, with Perrier as ringleader. He screams, he swears, he hovers obsessively over his sauces, tossing in dollops of heavy cream and large nobs of butter whenever backs are turned. But even as the intensity of the job, and its 21-hour workdays, takes its toll, Perrier struggles with his decision to relinquish control. More than just a vivid character study of a dedicated and passionate perfectionist, King Georges is a touching tribute to this master chef who realizes it is time to pass the torch on to the next generation whom he’s mentored so well.

    For more information, including other upcoming Full Frame programming, click here. Note that while both screenings are free, all attendees must reserve a ticket via Eventbrite, available at 9 a.m. on the day of the event.

    The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is a program of the Center for Documentary Studies.

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      FREE August 6: Full Frame Screening of “Beauty is Embarrassing”

      July 29th, 2015
      Word painting by Wayne White

      “Beauty is Embarrassing” word painting by Wayne White

      Put it on your calendar: the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival will present a one night only free screening of 2012 festival favorite Beauty is Embarrassing in Durham as part of the Full Frame Road Show presented by PNC.

      Thursday, August 6, 7:30 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.)
      21C Museum Hotel
      111 North Corcoran St., Durham, North Carolina
      Directions
             

      Meet Wayne White—affable Emmy award-winning artist and profane, prolific iconoclast full of frenetic energy and southern verve. You may recognize his incredibly creative artwork from Pee-wee’s Playhouse or music videos for the Smashing Pumpkins and Peter Gabriel. Or perhaps you’ve seen one of his hysterically irreverent paintings—where he crafts cleverly concise words in a 3D effect onto repurposed vintage landscape reproductions.

      Director Neil Berkeley quickly draws you in as he steadfastly trains his camera on the artist, wisely letting White act as his own narrator. White essentially sums up the trajectory of his artistic life and his process when he states early on, “I want to try everything I can. I want to take this painting idea and see if you can do a puppet version of it. I want to take this cartooning and turn it into a set. I want to take this set and turn it back into a painting.” And so he does.

      For more information, including other upcoming Full Frame programming, click here. Note that while Full Frame Road Show screenings are free, all attendees must reserve a ticket via Eventbrite, available at 9 a.m. on the day of the event.

      The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is a program of the Center for Documentary Studies.

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        Jessica Ingram’s “Road Through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial” Opens August 10 at CDS

        July 15th, 2015
        Welcome to Midnight, Mississippi, 2007. Photograph by Jessica Ingram.

        “Welcome to Midnight, Mississippi, 2007.” Photograph by Jessica Ingram.

        Road Through Midnight: A Civil Rights Memorial will be on view at the Center for Documentary Studies from August 10 to October 17, 2015. The exhibit presents thirty of Jessica Ingram’s photographs of both marked and unmarked locations of historic significance to the struggle for civil rights in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. The exhibit also presents audio oral histories from Ingram’s interviews with family members, local people, and journalists who witnessed, were impacted by, and remember these events.

        Exhibition Dates: August 10–October 17, 2015
        Reception + Artist’s Talk: September 17, 2015, 6–9 p.m.

        Center for Documentary Studies, Juanita Kreps Gallery
        1317 W. Pettigrew St., Durham, North Carolina
        Directions

        In 2006, while exploring downtown Montgomery, Alabama, Jessica Ingram found herself standing on the former Court Square slave market. The historical marker presented facts, including the dollar values paid for slaves, but said nothing about the meaning of the place. “I’m from the South and was raised with an awareness of the devastating history of slavery,” says Ingram, “but this site sparked something in me that caught fire.”

        Curious about other sites, and what hidden histories she might be passing as she drove across the South, Ingram began researching and photographing places where civil rights–era atrocities, Klan activities, and slave trading occurred, like a building in Pulaski, Tennessee, not far from where she grew up. The Ku Klux Klan was founded in a law office there; the original historical marker on the building had been unbolted, flipped around, and reattached so that only the back of it could be seen. Unlike that site, or the slave market in Montgomery, there are no markers at most of the places Ingram has documented. As the years pass and the landscape transforms itself in ways both beautiful and banal, all that remains of these events are the memories and voices of those who lived through them.

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          Closing Reception, August 21: “Phone Home Durham” Exhibit

          July 10th, 2015
          Images featured in "Phone Home Durham." Top:  "Eno State Park" by Dawn Surratt. Lower Left: "Catsburg Country Store/ Old Oxford Road" by Stephanie Leathers. Lower Right: "Near Herndon Hills Farm" by Julie Rhodes.

          Images featured in “Phone Home Durham.” Top: “Eno State Park” by Dawn Surratt. Lower Left: “Catsburg Country Store/ Old Oxford Road” by Stephanie Leathers. Lower Right: “Near Herndon Hills Farm” by Julie Rhodes.

          “Through this performance, the digital converts to the material—from an image living in the world of the virtual to being something that can hang on a wall, rest in a box, live as a print and become historical record.” —Caitlin Margaret Kelly,  Power Plant Gallery public programs director

          The Power Plant Gallery, a laboratory for the arts at Duke University, invites you to explore an exhibit of crowdsourced digital images celebrating Durham localities and identities in Phone Home Durham.  For this exhibition, the Power Plant Gallery invited mobile phone photographers from all walks of life to submit images of Durham County taken with mobile phone cameras or other handheld devices. A public closing reception for the exhibit will be held on Friday, August 21.

          Phone Home Durham
          May 29–August 22, 2015
          Closing Reception: Friday, August 21, 5–8 p.m.
          Gallery Summer Hours: Thursday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Tuesday & Wednesday by appt. only
          Power Plant Gallery, American Tobacco Campus
          320 Blackwell Street, Durham, North Carolina (Directions)

          A select number of photographs from the open call were printed for Phone Home Durham and will be added to the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University’s David M. Rubenstein Library following the exhibit’s closing. The gallery will continue to accept submissions throughout the exhibition for the “rotating wall” through August 22. For more information on submitting a photograph, visit the Power Plant Gallery’s website.

          Print the Phone Home Durham gallery guide, which includes a list of photographers whose work is on display throughout the exhibit.

          The Power Plant Gallery is a joint initiative of Duke’s MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts and the Center for Documentary Studies. Phone Home Durham is cosponsored by Museo Digital Fine Art Media and the Durham County Libraries.

           

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            Abbie Gascho Landis Awarded 2015 CDS Documentary Essay Prize in Writing

            July 10th, 2015
            Abbie Gascho Landis

            Abbie Gascho Landis

            By now I have become a freshwater mussel groupie. I fawn over photographs. . . . I stalk them from a distance, writing their names in my notebooks: fatmucket, pistolgrip, heelsplitter, shinyrayed pocketbook, spectaclecase, pigtoe, snufflebox. I pore over their bios. Posters of mussels hang in our bedroom. —Abbie Gascho Landis, from her prizewinning essay

            The CDS Documentary Essay Prize honors the best in documentary photography and writing in alternating years: one year, photos; one year, writing. The 2015 prize competition in writing was awarded to Abbie Gascho Landis, a writer and veterinarian in Cobleskill, New York, for “Immersion: Our Native Mussels and Bodies of Freshwater.” In her essay, Landis draws on six years of snorkeling in creeks, exploring large rivers, visiting laboratories, and interviewing biologists, weaving personal experience into her investigation of “these remarkable animals” and their habitats as one way of looking at growing water issues in the Deep South and elsewhere in the United States. “Endangered mussels have garnered national attention in recent water wars involving conflicts with agriculture and with cities like Atlanta during droughts,” Landis writes in her project statement. “While mussels have been studied for more than a century, research has recently ballooned, revealing complexities about their lives and roles in river systems.”

            MusselApertures

            Mussels’ apertures, Paint Rock River, Alabama. Photograph by Abbie Gascho Landis.

            In her essay, Landis writes: [Mussels] have been called naiads, after Greek mythology’s freshwater nymphs, each linked inextricably to a particular stream or river. Some mussels are widespread, while some exist only in a single river system and some—like the Tar River spinymussel—live in only a few creek sites. Mussels evolved with their river’s flow and geology, requiring particular river bottom habitat. Their need for host fish links them to vulnerable fish diversity.

            Human-driven changes to creeks and rivers often disrupt water flow and quality, destroy the creek bed, and alter fish populations. When a waterway changes, mussels are the first to know. They may die outright, or be unable to reproduce. Like the check engine light on a dashboard, mussels indicate when there’s a problem with how their river is running. . . .

            Abbie Gascho Landis writes a blog, thedigandflow.com, and is a veterinarian at the Cobleskill Veterinary Clinic in Cobleskill, New York. Landis has received an Arthur DeLong Writing Award and was a finalist for the Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Award in 2013. She has a bachelor’s degree in English and biology from Goshen College and a doctorate in veterinary medicine from Ohio State University. Landis receives $3,000 and will give a reading at the Center for Documentary Studies. Her work will also be placed in Duke University’s Archive of Documentary Arts at the David M. Rubenstein Library. An excerpt from “Immersion: Our Native Mussels and Bodies of Freshwater,” will appear in the Winter 2015–16 issue of Document, and the essay in full will be published on our website in 2016.

            ________________________________________________________________________________________________

            Jessica Wilbanks was awarded Honorable Mention by the members of the Center for Documentary Studies Documentary Essay Prize selection committee for her beautifully crafted essay, “The Far Side of the Fire,” which explores widespread charges of witchcraft against Nigerian children and reflects on her own experiences growing up in the Pentecostal faith. Wilbanks has a BFA in creative nonfiction and theology from Hampshire College and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Houston. Her work has appeared in such publications as the Sycamore Review, Ninth Letter, Ruminate Magazine, and The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses 2014.

            There were other four finalists for the 2014 CDS Documentary Essay Prize in Writing, selected from forty-two entries:
            Gaiutra Bahadur, “Into Dark Waters”
            Benjamin Busch, “Unconscionable Maps”
            Howard L. Craft, “Bull City Summer: Blue Monsters, Mattresses, and Durmites”
            Tessa Fontaine, “A Mouth Full of Fire: Inside the Last American Sideshow”

            The next CDS Documentary Essay competition will be for photography; submissions will be accepted from November 2, 2015, to February 16, 2016. Click here for guidelines.

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              Now Available: Lineup for Fall 2015 Continuing Education Courses, Both Onsite and Online

              July 2nd, 2015
              Mapmaking From the Ground Up, about "activist mapmaking," is one of CDS's courses offered in the fall.

              Mapmaking From the Ground Up, about “activist mapmaking,” is one of CDS’s courses offered in the fall.

              The Center for Documentary Studies offers Continuing Education classes year-round—in photography, video, audio, narrative writing, and other creative media. Registration is now open for Fall 2015 classes and workshops (and a few remaining summer institutes) with a host of established, new, and online classes on offer; see our ten new courses below, several of which are new online versions of established onsite courses.

              A complete listing of all Fall 2015 courses as well as registration information can be found here.

              New Continuing Education Courses for Fall 2015 Semester:

              Onsite and Online:
              *Make That Audio Doc | Sarah Reynolds | Onsite and Online 
              *The Enduring Image | Bryce Lankard | Onsite and Online
              *The Art of Memoir | Krista Bremer | Onsite and Online

              Online Only:
              Memoir of Mobility and Movement | Deavours Hall and Rhonda Klevansky

              Onsite Only:
              Documentary Night Photography | Hal Goodtree

              Photographic Workflow with Lightroom | Eric Waters
              Exploring Contemporary Documentary | Joshua Dasal
              Why Should I Care? Crafting Video Stories That Move People | Catherine Orr and Elena Rue
              Documenting Life, Briefly: Writing Flash Nonfiction | Leslie Maxwell
              Participating Language: Introduction to Documentary Poetics | Andrea Applebee

              Additionally, two summer intensive institutes in the documentary arts are still open for registration: the Digging In Artists’ Retreat from July 26–August 1, 2015, and the Making It Sing audio institute from August 3–8, 2015. More information on the remaining summer institutes can be found here.

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                August 28: “Audio Under the Stars” Audio Festival Continues With “True Romance”

                June 30th, 2015
                Illustration by Jenn Hales (detail).

                Illustration by Jenn Hales (detail).

                What if the person, place, or thing that sets your heart strings strumming also sets you apart in some way? What if your happily ever after… wasn’t? We want to hear about unorthodox cravings, unexpected endings, and love stories of all stripes. — Audio Under the Stars creators Jenny Morgan and Elizabeth Friend on “True Romance,” the theme of the upcoming event

                Audio Under the Starsa series of summer-long outdoor listening parties created by alums of the Center for Documentary Studies summer audio institutes—debuted last summer to widespread delight, with curated playlists of most compelling, fun audio pieces. CDS is delighted to continue hosting this summer’s series on Friday, August 28, with True Romance: Love Stories of All Stripes. Scroll down for the remaining series schedule.

                Bring your own lawn chair or blanket. Dang Good Dogs will be selling hot dogs, turkey dogs, and veggie dogs all night. Audio Under the Stars is rain or shine. If it’s raining, we’ll be in the auditorium at CDS.

                Additionally, the producers of Audio Under the Stars will be on location at the Durham History Hub on Saturday, August 1 to record audio stories of romance for potential use in the August 28 program. You can find more information on the Durham History Hub blog.

                Stay up to date with Audio Under the Stars happenings through Facebook; use this link to submit your audio stories.

                Note: Shows are from 8–10 p.m. at the Center for Documentary Studies, in Durham, North Carolina. Free parking. Directions.

                Bad Advice and Second Chances
                Submissions Deadline: August 11
                Show: September 25
                Some of us have actually paid cash money for a 1974 Dodge Dart. Tell us your stories about when you listened to your Uncle Leo rather than your common sense and a Consumer Reports review, or any other time you told that small voice in your head to shut up and sit down, and how you’ve lived to tell the tale.

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                  July 24: “Audio Under the Stars” Audio Festival Continues With “Dog Days”

                  June 30th, 2015
                  Illustration by Jenn Hales (detail).

                  Illustration by Jenn Hales (detail).

                  Summertime is more than lazy days and picnics. The Dog Days were once considered an evil time when “wine grew sour and dogs turned mad.”  We take a look at the good and the bad: summer flings and overheated outbursts; stories of indolence and frenzy. Plus, dogs. We like dogs. — Audio Under the Stars creators Jenny Morgan and Elizabeth Friend on “Dog Days,” the theme of the upcoming event

                  Audio Under the Starsa series of summer-long outdoor listening parties created by alums of the Center for Documentary Studies summer audio institutes—debuted last summer to widespread delight, with curated playlists of most compelling, fun audio pieces. CDS is delighted to continue hosting this summer’s series on Friday, July 24, with Dog Days: Stories of Indolence and Frenzy. Scroll down for the full series schedule.

                  Bring your own lawn chair or blanket. Dang Good Dogs will be selling hot dogs, turkey dogs, and veggie dogs all night. Audio Under the Stars is rain or shine. If it’s raining, we’ll be in the auditorium at CDS.

                  Stay up to date with Audio Under the Stars happenings through Facebook; use this link to submit your audio stories.

                  Note: Shows are from 8–10 p.m. at the Center for Documentary Studies, in Durham, North Carolina. Free parking. Directions.

                  Alternative Romance: Love Stories of All Stripes
                  Submissions Deadline: July 14
                  Show: August 28
                  What if the person, place, or thing that sets your heart strings strumming also sets you apart in some way? What if your happily ever after… wasn’t? We want to hear about unorthodox cravings, unexpected endings, and love stories of all stripes.

                  Bad Advice and Second Chances
                  Submissions Deadline: August 11
                  Show: September 25
                  Some of us have actually paid cash money for a 1974 Dodge Dart. Tell us your stories about when you listened to your Uncle Leo rather than your common sense and a Consumer Reports review, or any other time you told that small voice in your head to shut up and sit down, and how you’ve lived to tell the tale.

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                    FREE July 17: Full Frame Third Friday Screening of “In Transit”

                    June 30th, 2015
                    Film still from the documentary film, "In Transit"

                    Film still from “In Transit”

                    Put it on your calendar: the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival will present a free Third Friday screening of In Transit in Durham as part of the Full Frame Road Show presented by PNC.

                    Friday, July 17, 7:30 p.m. (doors at 7 p.m.)
                    Full Frame Theater, Power Plant building
                    American Tobacco Campus
                    320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina
                    Directions
                           

                    On the train, life pulls into uncommon focus. In the space between stations, where “real life” is suspended, a peculiar atmosphere of contemplation and community develops. To some passengers, the train is flight and salvation, to others reckoning and loss. But for all, it is a place for personal reflection and connecting with others they may otherwise never know. In Transit delves the hearts and minds of everyday passengers aboard Amtrak’s Empire Builder, the busiest long-distance train route in America. View trailer. Candid and direct, the film unfolds as a series of interconnected vignettes, ranging from overheard conversations to moments of deep intimacy, in which passengers share their fears, hopes, and dreams. As the Empire Builder crisscrosses the country, passing through urban centers, oil fields, vast plains, and towering mountains, a loving portrait of America emerges, in its full human and natural beauty.

                    For more information, including other upcoming Full Frame programming, click here. Note that while Full Frame Third Friday screenings are free, all attendees must reserve a ticket via Eventbrite, available at 9 a.m. on the day of the event.

                    The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival is a program of the Center for Documentary Studies.

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                      2015 John Hope Franklin Award Winners Immerse Themselves in Summer-Long Documentary Projects

                      June 29th, 2015
                      Photo by Reem Alfahad, taken during an Arts-Policy Internship with the Ministry of  Culture in Medellin, Colombia

                      Photo by Reem Alfahad, taken during an Arts-Policy Internship with the Ministry of Culture in Medellin, Colombia

                      And they’re off….six undergraduates and recent graduates from local universities will be pursuing summerlong documentary projects as recipients of the 2015 John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Awards. While many of the Center for Documentary Studies‘ awards are national or international in focus, the John Hope Franklin awards go to Triangle-area undergraduates who wish to pursue projects involving oral history, photography, film or video, and/or writing. Established by CDS in 1989, the awards are named for the noted scholar John Hope Franklin, professor emeritus of history at Duke University, in recognition of his lifetime accomplishments and his dedication to students and teaching.

                      Congratulations to the 2015 John Hope Franklin Student Documentary Award winners; we’ll be following their progress as they immerse themselves in their projects:

                      Reem Alfahad (Duke University), a Baldwin Scholar who majored in public policy, graduated in May 2015. Through her project, “Hope and Reconciliation,” she will explore the narratives of young artists in Medellin, Colombia, as they grapple with their city’s past and present. While these artists grew up after the death of Pablo Escobar and are experiencing the ongoing revival of their city, narco-trafficking, poverty, and displacement are ongoing realities in present-day Medellin. Reem will be based at the Proyecto Boston Medellin (PBM), and will create profiles of several artists and the trajectories of their artwork and stories through her writing and audio work. One of the potential artists creates silhouettes of gang members, sex-workers, and street vendors; another documents his family’s dairy farm on the outskirts of the city, which faces questions of preserving natural spaces in the face of encroaching development.

                      Mariana Calvo (Duke University) is a rising junior studying history and public policy. In the summer of 2014, she participated in a DukeEngage program in Tucson, Arizona, where she worked with a number of women from the western highlands of Guatemala. For her project, she will travel to Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, conduct oral history interviews on the country’s civil war, and write an essay drawing on the connections between the civil war and immigration to the United States. “The narratives surrounding Latin America are often as places of absence—of absence of wealth, of absence of history, of absence of the rule of law. However, as a Latin American I know that there is so much cultural and historical wealth in Latin America, and in this case specifically, Guatemala. My goal in writing this essay is to show people that Guatemala, and other countries that have historically supplied immigrants to the United States, have an intrinsic value, and that we should work to keep people from immigrating.”

                      Brenna Cukier (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) graduated in May 2015 as a Robertson Scholar with a major in journalism and mass communication and will be a CDS Lewis Hine Documentary Fellow in 2015–2016. She also received a CDS Certificate in Documentary Studies from Duke University. The granddaughter of a Holocaust survivor whose family fled Berlin, Brenna is working with an organization that handles claims for the restoration of German citizenship for Jewish victims of the Nazi regime and their descendants. Brenna will be making a film that documents this process while simultaneously telling her grandmother’s story. “The culmination of my documentary will be a trip to my grandmother’s hometown of Berlin this summer after I secure my German citizenship. My goal is to document my first experiences in a country I have never visited or lived in, but will all of a sudden officially ‘belong to.’ . . . I intend to explore and document my experiences in modern-day Europe as a Jew, which I believe is of particular relevance given the many recent acts of anti-Semitism there.”

                      Christine Delp (Duke University) graduated in May 2015 with a self-designed Program II major in ethics and visual documentary studies. Her project will be a short film, Derailleur, that examines the bicycle through documentary and ethnographic lenses: “The bicycle is both a symbol of youthful innocence and adulthood nostalgia. It is used by both privileged communities for health and environmental reasons, as well as less privileged communities as a form of cheaper transportation. It evokes feelings of power and freedom within the rider, as well as fear and danger. Economically, the bicycle is perhaps more democratically accessible; but in space, it—or rather its rider—is a precarious authoritarian. Furthermore, as a human-powered, open-aired, and unpredictable machine, the bicycle resists modern norms for transportation systems. The film’s narration will explore these themes and others through a detached voice in the style of a documentary essay, similar to a nature film. Though the film is not strictly satirical, the style of examining the bicycle both as an unfamiliar object and as a means for social commentary will likely contain satirical elements.”

                      Grace Farson and Amirah Jiwa (University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill) are creating a joint project. Grace graduated in May 2015 and majored in media production and food studies; Amirah will graduate in December 2015 and is majoring in economics and peace, war, and defense. Their interactive website will use photographs, video, and a long-form narrative writing to explore the link between conflict and a culture of innovation in Israel and the West Bank. “There is much optimism around the idea that the strengthening of economic ties through the technology sector will also contribute to the strengthening of political ties between Israel and the West Bank, and this project will highlight some of the partnerships between Israelis and Palestinians within this developing sector. So far in this narrative, the idea that conflict is not impeding innovation in the region has been central. A secondary focus, however, will be to explore the possibility that perhaps conflict is the cause of the culture of innovation in both societies. Being risk-loving is a key entrepreneurial trait, and living in an environment of uncertainty . . . might encourage the ‘all or nothing’ attitude that is the backbone of success for so many startups.”

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