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    CDS Announces Undergraduate Summer School Classes

    March 27th, 2015

    undergrad

    The Center for Documentary Studies is sponsoring four summer school classes for Duke University undergraduates, see below, in addition to a number of other summer courses cross-listed with Documentary Studies (DOCST). (The classes are also open to high school students and visiting undergrads.)

    Click here for more information on how to register. Scroll down for instructor bios.

    TERM 1 (May 13–June 25)

    DOCST 105S Documentary Experience: A Video Approach
    
Instructor: Gary Hawkins
    MTuTh 2–4:05 p.m. (Smith Warehouse, Bay 12, Room 228)
    A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. Working closely with local groups, students will explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Each student will complete an edited video as a final project. Cross list: CULANTH 106S, AMI 331S, HISTORY 125S, POLSCI 105S, PUBPOL 170S, VMS 106S

    DOCST 115S Introduction to Black-and-White Photography
    
Instructor: Aaron Canipe
    MTuTh 2–4:05 p.m. (CDS, Bridges 201)
    Foundation class in photography utilizing black-and-white film and a wet darkroom. Students shoot, process, and print individual work throughout the semester. Emphasis on continual visual exploration of meaning and metaphor in the form of regular assignments, slide lectures of important historic and contemporary photographic work, and critiques of each other’s work. No textbooks are required, though students will need to budget a comparable amount for supplies and equipment. Cross list: ARTSVIS 115S/VMS 115S


    TERM 2 (June 29–August 9) 

    DOCST 115S Introduction to Black-and-White Photography
    Instructor: Jon-Sesrie Goff
    MTuTh 2–4:05 p.m. (CDS, Bridges 201)
    Foundation class in photography utilizing black-and-white film and a wet darkroom. Students shoot, process, and print individual work throughout the semester. Emphasis on continual visual exploration of meaning and metaphor in the form of regular assignments, slide lectures of important historic and contemporary photographic work, and critiques of each other’s work. No textbooks are required, though students will need to budget a comparable amount for supplies and equipment. Cross list: ARTSVIS 115S/VMS 115S

    DOCST 224S: Literacy Through Photography
    Instructor: Katie Hyde
    MTuWThF 2–4:05 p.m. (Perkins LINK 070, Seminar 4)
    Explores the Literacy Through Photography arts education methodology, which encourages children to explore their world as they photograph scenes from their own lives, using their images as catalysts for verbal and written expression. Students train in LTP’s methodology, including discussing LTP projects from around the world and engaging in LTP internships with Durham Public Schools. Encourages participants to see through the eyes of others—to understand LTP writings and photographs as expressions of young people’s culture and time. Class meetings involve lectures and presentations, class discussions, as well as hands-on activities with classmates and collaborating youth. Includes a service-learning component involving work in the community. Consent of instructor required. Cross list: EDUC 244S, VMS 207S

    Gary Hawkins is a filmmaker and longtime film instructor at the Center for Documentary Studies. Previously, he was a member of the directing faculty at the North Carolina School of the Arts, in the School of Filmmaking, from 1991 until 1999. Hawkins has written and directed six films, including award-winning films in his acclaimed series about working-class Southern authors, the Emmy-winning Rough South of Harry Crews and The Rough South of Larry Brown, which was picked by The Oxford American as one of Thirteen Essential Southern Documentaries. Hawkins wrote the screenplay for last year’s Joe, adapted from the book by Larry Brown; the film was directed by David Gordon Green and starred Nicolas Cage and Tye Sheridan.

    Jon-Sesrie Goff is an MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts student at Duke University (’16). His work explores identity through the image of the community. Jon has over a decade of production experience, working on a range of projects across genre including the recently released documentaries Evolution of a Criminal (winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the 2014 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival) and Out In the Night. Prior to returning to school, he spent two years teaching film production as an adjunct professor at Villanova University and West Chester University of Pennsylvania.

    Aaron Canipe earned a BFA in photography in 2012 from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in Washington, D.C. While in D.C, he worked as a photographer and contemporary collection archivist at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Canipe also cofounded the publishing and design imprint Empty Stretch, which focuses on curating books, zines, and exhibitions highlighting up-and-coming artists and photographers. Canipe’s own work has been published in the Washington Post, the Oxford American, and many independent print and web outlets and widely exhibited throughout the Southeast. While at Duke, Canipe has worked to process and digitize works from the William Gedney Collection. In 2015, as a part of his MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts thesis project, he self-published a book of photographs called Plateau.

    Katie Hyde is the director of Literacy Through Photography (LTP), a program based at the Center for Documentary Studies. In this capacity, she works closely with undergraduate students, community volunteers, and teachers and students in the Durham Public Schools. Hyde is also one of the leaders of LTP Arusha, a DukeEngage initiative that is part of an effort to work with teachers in Arusha, Tanzania, to build an LTP program. She teaches an LTP course that deals with children’s self-expression and with race and gender issues within education, as well as Sociology Through Photography, which uses documentary photography as a tool to see the world through a sociological lens. Hyde earned her doctorate in sociology at North Carolina State University. She has explored how social inequalities are constructed, perpetuated, and resisted through fieldwork and other research on recent Latino/a immigration in North Carolina, women’s activism in Russia, and girls’ education in rural Nepal.

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      MFA|EDA Class of 2016 Launches “Influences” Blog

      March 26th, 2015
      Photo-blur painting by Gerhard Richter, an influential artist for MFA|EDA student Michaela O'Brien

      Photo-blur painting by Gerhard Richter, an influential artist for MFA|EDA student Michaela O’Brien

      In the first semester of the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program at Duke, the Documentary Fieldwork seminar is taught as an opportunity for students to create a new body of documentary work, in a sense to define what they mean by documentary work through their own artistic practice. This new work—presented at the end of the semester—shows where students are going.

      But students are asked to look back as well, to show us where they have come from. Once a semester each member of the seminar presents his or her influences:  the films, photographs, artists, books, music, and experiences that have most influenced their own work. This blog, Influences, is a record of those presentations by students in the Class of 2016. This is the fourth year we have posted these blogs, an online space that is becoming a cumulative and interactive syllabus for anyone interested in what has inspired this new generation of documentary artists. Click here to view the current Influences blog; click here to view the Influences archive.

      —Alex Harris, Center for Documentary Studies cofounder, Professor of the Practice of Public Policy and Documentary Studies at Duke University

      Duke University’s Center for Documentary Studies, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, and Program in Arts of the Moving Image are the three founding units of the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts program.

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        April 4: Special Screening of “In My Mind” at the National Gallery of Art

        March 23rd, 2015
        Jazz pianist Jason Moran, from In My Mind

        Jazz pianist Jason Moran, from In My Mind

        On April 4, a special screening at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., of a film from CDS will be presented in collaboration with the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Called “a masterpiece of music documentary craft” by Slant magazine, In My Mind (2010) documents jazz musician Jason Moran and The Big Bandwagon’s original interpretation of a legendary 1959 performance by Thelonious Monk. In My Mind was written and directed by filmmaker and CDS instructor Gary Hawkins and filmed as part of his Intermediate Documentary Filmmaking Course, with students participating in the shooting. The project grew out of Moran’s residency at Duke and CDS’s Jazz Loft Project. Hawkins, In My Mind producer Emily LaDue, and Moran will introduce the film. Prior to the screening, on March 28, Moran and his band will perform the multimedia Monk tribute at the Kennedy Center.

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          March 26: CDS Undergrad Outreach Film Series Continues With “Border Crossing 101″

          March 23rd, 2015

           

          Students in “The US/Mexico Border” course at Duke University. Class discussion often drifted to everyday borders that the students experience in North Carolina. Film still from “Border Crossing 101,” directed by Charlie Thompson.

          Students in “The U.S./Mexico Border” course at Duke University. Class discussion often drifted to everyday borders that the students experience in North Carolina. Film still from “Border Crossing 101,” directed by Charlie Thompson.

          The Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) is presenting a four-part screening series on Duke University’s campus to raise students’ awareness of CDS, particularly first-year undergraduates. Following the screening of each documentary—Grizzly Man, Harlan County USA, The Invisible War, and Border Crossing 101—Chris White, a Duke University sophomore and the CDS undergraduate outreach coordinator, will facilitate discussions in the manner of courses he has taken as an undergraduate at CDS— discussing the techniques and styles of the filmmaker, the policy-driven intentions and consequences of the films, and the overall impact of the films, which exhibit three different styles of documentary work.

          Border Crossing 101 (Charlie Thompson, work-in-progress)
          Thursday, March 26, 7:30 p.m.
          Gross Hall 107, Duke West Campus

          Fifteen students in”The U.S./Mexico Border,” a Duke University class taught by documentarian and Duke professor Charlie Thompson, explore the meaning of borders, immigration, and access to education in America. Four of them are “guest students” and non-citizens. They act, for a semester, as if barriers to their education no longer exist. Border Crossing 101 follows the lives of the four guest students, along with the eleven who go through the semester with them, as they explore their diverse pasts and gain insights into citizenship, entitlement, and identity in America. In the end, the students have broken down personal barriers and stereotypes, but one major barrier remains. Following the screening, there will be a Q&A with Thompson and students from the film. Border Crossing 101 is part of the Two-Way Bridges Project funded by Humanities Writ Large at Duke.

          Previous films in the series:

          Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, 2006)
          Wednesday, February 25, 7 p.m.
          Carr 136, Duke East Campus

          “Mr. Herzog is no ordinary filmmaker. It is the rare documentary like Grizzly Man, which has beauty and passion often lacking in any type of film, that makes you want to grab its maker and head off to the nearest bar to discuss man’s domination of nature and how Disney’s cute critters reflect our profound alienation from the natural order.” –Manohla Dargis, New York Times review of Grizzly Man, 2005

          Werner Herzog has been described as a daring and intense filmmaker throughout his long career. Grizzly Man is one of Herzog’s most successful films, and definitely one that stands out in comparison to his others. Many critics have used the descriptions “comical” and “tragic” to describe the film. Using footage caught by Timothy Treadwell himself, Herzog crafts an amazing story about Treadwell’s life with the grizzlies.

          Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976)
          Wednesday, March 18, 7 p.m.
          Carr 136, Duke East Campus

          Harlan County USA was born out of footage made by Barbara Kopple chronicling the “Brookside Strike,” which occurred in southeast Kentucky in 1973. Lacking any narration by Kopple, Harlan County USA is an example of a verité film that places audiences directly in the experiences of the events of the coal miners’ strike as they were happening.

          The Invisible War (Kirby Dick, 2012)
          Wednesday, April 15, 7 p.m.
          Carr 136, Duke East Campus

           The Invisible War focuses on the story of one individual to tell the stories of hundreds of men and women who have experienced sexual assault in the military. The Invisible War uses a number of interviews to inform the public about a harrowing issue that has existed in the military for years.

           

          Chris White is a sophomore undergraduate student at Duke University who is studying public policy and documentary studies. He has taken multiple classes at CDS, which he is using as a model for these screenings and discussions.

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            Lynsey Addario’s “Veiled Rebellion: Women in Afghanistan” Now On View Through April 18

            March 22nd, 2015
            "Veiled Rebellion," photograph by Lynsey Addario.

            From Veiled Rebellion. Photograph by Lynsey Addario.

            Veiled Rebellion: Women in Afghanistan is on view at the Center for Documentary Studies through April 18. Renowned conflict photographer Lynsey Addario, a MacArthur Genius Grant recipient, made her first trip to Afghanistan in 2000 to document the lives of women under the Taliban. Addario has returned many times, always training a close eye on women’s lives in all areas of Afghan society: culture, politics, education, employment, and domestic life.

            Exhibition Dates: February 9–April 18, 2015
            Center for Documentary Studies, Juanita Kreps Gallery
            1317 W. Pettigrew St., Durham, North Carolina
            Directions

            Much has changed—the same stadium where the Taliban performed public executions now hosts events for both sexes—but Afghanistan remains a country where it is extremely difficult to photograph women because of cultural and societal taboos. The body of work in Veiled Rebellion is the result of Addario’s 2009 commission by National Geographic for a comprehensive photo essay depicting the many facets of women’s lives in Afghanistan.

            Veiled Rebellion is presented in partnership with Project&, an arts entity focused on cultural production with social impact. For more information, please visit projectand.org. All works created by Lynsey Addario.

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              “One Person, One Vote”: New Website Celebrates the Grassroots Legacy of SNCC

              March 22nd, 2015
              The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) helped organize a voter registration project in Lowndes County, Alabama, where black voters formed their own party and voted in their own primary; Lowndes County, Alabama,  May 3, 1966. Photograph by Maria Varela, 3910713 Take Stock.

              The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) helped organize a voter registration project in Lowndes County, Alabama, where black voters formed their own party and voted in their own primary; Lowndes County, Alabama, May 3, 1966. Photograph by Maria Varela, 3910713 Take Stock.

              Before the beatings on the bridge in Selma, before the Voting Rights Act of 1965, young people in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) united with local communities in the Deep South to build a grassroots movement for change.

              A new multimedia website from the SNCC Legacy Project and Duke University—One Person, One Vote: The Legacy of SNCC and the Fight for Voting Rights—tells the story of how SNCC’s commitment to community organizing forged a movement for voting rights made up of thousands of local people, one that sought to make real the promise of America: equal opportunity for all…one person, one vote. Onevotesncc.org honors the heroes of the struggle for voting rights—sharecroppers and domestic workers, World War II veterans and high school students, young activists and seasoned mentors.

              The website is part of a partnership between the SNCC Legacy Project and Duke University that was formed to chronicle the historic struggles for voting rights and to develop ongoing programs that contribute to a more civil and inclusive democracy. Click here and here to read more about the overall intiative.

              Click here to listen to an interview with SNCC veteran Charlie Cobb and Duke undergraduate Amina Bility on NPR’s “Here and Now.” Cobb is the first Activist-in-Residence with the SNCC-Duke partnership; Bility is a Duke undergraduate involved in the project.

              The Center for Documentary Studies and Duke University Libraries are involved in the SNCC-Duke initiative.

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                March 25: Event with Award-Winning Filmmaker and Lehman Brady Professor Marco Williams

                March 21st, 2015
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                Filmmaker Marco Williams

                The Center for Documentary Studies is pleased to present a public talk with filmmaker Marco Williams, the 2014–15 Lehman Brady Visiting Joint Chair Professor in Documentary Studies and American Studies. CDS coordinates the cross-campus collaboration between Duke University and the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, which brings distinguished practitioners and scholars of the documentary arts to both schools.

                “From Opposition to Empathy: A Conversation with Marco Williams”
                Wednesday, March 25, 7 p.m., reception to follow
                Nasher Museum of Art
                2001 Campus Dr., Durham, North Carolina

                His films, the 2014 Guggenheim Fellow says, are “about the boundaries marking difference in the U.S.—racial politics, identity, and immigration.” In this conversation—”From Opposition to Empathy”—Williams will show excerpts from his films, including content from the website of his most recent, The Undocumented, in order to illustrate his approach in navigating storylines where his main characters are often in direct opposition to one another.

                Click here for more information on Williams, his films, and his Lehman Brady Professorship.

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                  May 7: Submissions Deadline for 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize

                  March 19th, 2015
                  Police helicopter, Englewood, Chicago, Illinois, 2012. From "South Side" by Jon Lowenstein, winner of the 2014 Lange-Taylor Prize.

                  Police helicopter, Englewood, Chicago, Illinois, 2012. From South Side by 2014 Lange-Taylor Prize winner Jon Lowenstein.

                  This year marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the prestigious Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize, awarded by the Center for Documentary Studies. The $10,000 prize is given to encourage documentary work in the tradition of acclaimed photographer Lange and writer and social scientist Taylor, and supports documentary artists—working alone or in teams—whose existing, extended fieldwork projects rely on the interplay of words and images.

                  Applications for the 2015 Lange-Taylor Prize will be accepted February 1–May 7, 2015. See How to Enter and FAQ’s for more information.

                  Words may be represented by audio or in graphic novel format. Edited oral histories, creative narratives, and poetry (that is both personal and social) are also encouraged. Single artists and collaborative teams working with text/audio/photographs/video/graphic novel format may apply. There are no restrictions regarding age, nationality, or subject matter.

                  The winner receives $10,000, a solo exhibition at the Center for Documentary Studies, and inclusion in the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University’s David M. Rubenstein Library. The winner will be publicly announced in September 2015; the winner’s solo exhibition will be on view at CDS in fall 2016.

                  Click here for information about and work by past Lange-Taylor Prize winners, including the 2014 winner, Jon Lowenstein.

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                    Special 25th Anniversary Issue of “Document” Available Online

                    March 14th, 2015
                    A selection from the cover of the Winter 2015 issue of “Document.”

                    Detail from the special 25th Anniversary issue of Document

                    The Center for Documentary Studies opened its doors as a nonprofit affiliate of Duke University in 1990; we’ll be celebrating our 25th Anniversary throughout 2015. Now online: a special anniversary issue of our quarterly publication, Document, which regularly features a selection of the best documentary work we support and produce.

                    To browse past issues, click here.

                    To receive print issues of Document, join Friends of CDS.

                     

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                      March 20: MFA|EDA Thesis Exhibition Kicks Off at the Power Plant Gallery & Boiler Room

                      March 13th, 2015
                      Photograph by Mendal Diana Polish, from Queer Home, a photographic series charting a hand-made path that foregrounds the intentional building of inter-generational queer family.

                      Photograph by Mendal Diana Polish (MFA|EDA ’15), from Queer Home, a photographic series charting a handmade path that foregrounds the intentional building of inter-generational queer family

                      This spring, Duke University’s MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts will celebrate the successes of the class of 2015 in MFA|EDA 2015, the program’s annual thesis exhibition on view from March 20–April 18. Following a kickoff event, the monthlong show continues at sites across Duke’s campus and downtown Durham.

                      MFA|EDA 2015 Kickoff Event
                      Friday, March 20, 5–8 p.m.
                      Power Plant Gallery and Boiler Room
                      American Tobacco Campus, 320 Blackwell St., Durham, North Carolina

                      Featuring site-specific projects by fourteen MFA|EDA graduating students, the exhibition presents a tremendous range of work including film and video, installation, photography, interactive arts, sound, and multimedia presented in a series of openings, film premieres, artist talks, and screenings at multiple venues.

                      MFA|EDA 2015 is supported by the three founding units of the MFA|EDA—the Center for Documentary Studies, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, and Program in the Arts of the Moving Image—Duke’s Kenan Institute for Ethics and Office of the Vice Provost for the Arts, and by The Carrack Modern Art and SPECTRE Arts. 

                      The Power Plant Gallery is a joint initiative of the Center for Documentary Studies and the MFA|EDA.

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